Cindy Baker

Cindy Baker

Cindy Baker

Cindy Baker

Cindy Baker is the force behind the successful Mercer County High School blood drives. Officially, she’s the school’s bookkeeper but she also acts as the blood drive chairperson. And at a school that hosts at least five successful blood drives a year, that’s a big undertaking. “Awareness is a big thing. We meet with incoming freshman and make them aware of blood donation and how KBC blood stays local,” said Baker, who also tries to make blood drives fun with candy bars and pizza parties. They also make the student donors feel special. “We reward the students. Seniors are required to do 10 community service hours to graduate. If they donate blood they get two hours,” she said. Seniors who have given a gallon or more during their high school career are presented a red cord at honors night to wear at graduation. “It signifies their contribution,” said Baker. But what about those students who are afraid to give donation a try? “I tell them, ‘for a little pinch you have the ability to save three lives or five baby lives.’”

Cindy Baker, Harrodsburg
Mercer County High School Bookkeeper, blood drive chair and blood donor

Kentucky Blood Center
2016-07-08T18:21:16-04:00

Cindy Baker, Harrodsburg
Mercer County High School Bookkeeper, blood drive chair and blood donor

Cindy Baker
Cindy Baker is the force behind the successful Mercer County High School blood drives. Officially, she’s the school’s bookkeeper but she also acts as the blood drive chairperson. And at a school that hosts at least five successful blood drives a year, that’s a big undertaking. “Awareness is a big thing. We meet with incoming freshman and make them aware of blood donation and how KBC blood stays local,” said Baker, who also tries to make blood drives fun with candy bars and pizza parties. They also make the student donors feel special. “We reward the students. Seniors are required to do 10 community service hours to graduate. If they donate blood they get two hours,” she said. Seniors who have given a gallon or more during their high school career are presented a red cord at honors night to wear at graduation. “It signifies their contribution,” said Baker. But what about those students who are afraid to give donation a try? “I tell them, ‘for a little pinch you have the ability to save three lives or five baby lives.’”
KENTUCKY BLOOD CENTER