Our Stories

Ann Welch

Ann Welch

Tanner was only 7 when he was diagnosed with brain cancer. “He began having symptoms in February. He was diagnosed in May and within days had two surgeries,” said his mom Ann Welch, a sergeant with the Lexington Police Department.

After the tumor was removed, Tanner underwent radiation and chemotherapy. Those treatments made him ill and weak. He needed blood transfusions to strengthen his little body. His first one was 4 weeks into radiation.

“When he got the transfusions, it was the most amazing thing. He’d be so lethargic and within 20 minutes, his color got better. He’d brighten up,” said Ann, who began recruiting friends and family to donate blood for Tanner. “It made me feel bad that we were using it all up. We needed to do our part.”

Her request was answered immediately by family friend Kim McClure. She became Tanner’s best donor. “Kim knew us and loved us enough to do it,” said Ann.

Tanner believed he felt better when he received Kim’s platelets. “When we’d see the yellow tag on the bag, (designating the platelets were designated specifically for Tanner), we’d take a picture of it and send it to Kim with a note that said ‘He’s getting your super-duper platelets,’” said Ann.

Ann watched her son get regular transfusions. “I guess I never thought about the continued need. You hear surgery and accidents, but you don’t realize the continued need for cancer patients. The treatment for cancer is important, sticking to the protocol outline. If you can’t do the treatment when you are supposed to, it could delay the outcomes. Tanner needed a transfusion to build him up enough to take the cancer treatment,” said Ann, who is delighted that the treatments worked and her 13-year old son is active, happy and healthy.

Ann Welch, Lexington
Lexington Police Officer, Recipient's mom

2016-07-08T18:03:01+00:00

Ann Welch, Lexington
Lexington Police Officer, Recipient's mom

Ann Welch
Tanner was only 7 when he was diagnosed with brain cancer. “He began having symptoms in February. He was diagnosed in May and within days had two surgeries,” said his mom Ann Welch, a sergeant with the Lexington Police Department. After the tumor was removed, Tanner underwent radiation and chemotherapy. Those treatments made him ill and weak. He needed blood transfusions to strengthen his little body. His first one was 4 weeks into radiation. “When he got the transfusions, it was the most amazing thing. He’d be so lethargic and within 20 minutes, his color got better. He’d brighten up,” said Ann, who began recruiting friends and family to donate blood for Tanner. “It made me feel bad that we were using it all up. We needed to do our part.” Her request was answered immediately by family friend Kim McClure. She became Tanner’s best donor. “Kim knew us and loved us enough to do it,” said Ann. Tanner believed he felt better when he received Kim’s platelets. “When we’d see the yellow tag on the bag, (designating the platelets were designated specifically for Tanner), we’d take a picture of it and send it to Kim with a note that said ‘He’s getting your super-duper platelets,’” said Ann. Ann watched her son get regular transfusions. “I guess I never thought about the continued need. You hear surgery and accidents, but you don’t realize the continued need for cancer patients. The treatment for cancer is important, sticking to the protocol outline. If you can’t do the treatment when you are supposed to, it could delay the outcomes. Tanner needed a transfusion to build him up enough to take the cancer treatment,” said Ann, who is delighted that the treatments worked and her 13-year old son is active, happy and healthy.

Joia Patterson

Joia Patterson is an admissions counselor for the University of Kentucky.

In her job, she’s on the move, traveling frequently to meet with high school students to encourage them to come to UK.

A medical problem slowed her down, though, but it wasn’t until she passed out and was taken to the E.R. that she discovered she was very anemic and close to developing even more serious issues. She received two units of blood. They told me, “If I didn’t get the transfusions I was on the verge of dying.

“By the grace of God, once I got everything sorted out, I realized donors helped me. Everything clicked about how important blood donors are,” said Joia, who now wants to raise awareness not just about the University of Kentucky but about blood donation, too.

Listen to Joia's special message for the blood donors who saved her life.

Joia Patterson, Lexington
Recipient

2016-07-08T18:23:47+00:00

Joia Patterson, Lexington
Recipient

Joia Patterson is an admissions counselor for the University of Kentucky. In her job, she’s on the move, traveling frequently to meet with high school students to encourage them to come to UK. A medical problem slowed her down, though, but it wasn’t until she passed out and was taken to the E.R. that she discovered she was very anemic and close to developing even more serious issues. She received two units of blood. They told me, “If I didn’t get the transfusions I was on the verge of dying. “By the grace of God, once I got everything sorted out, I realized donors helped me. Everything clicked about how important blood donors are,” said Joia, who now wants to raise awareness not just about the University of Kentucky but about blood donation, too. Listen to Joia's special message for the blood donors who saved her life.

Gracey Wuest

Gracey has a rare autoimmune disease called Juvenile Dermatomyositis, a condition in which the immune system turns on to fight viruses but doesn't turn back off, causing it to attack healthy cells and tissue. Every four weeks, she receives a dose of medicine to help manage this disease. Making the treatment, however, requires over 1,000 blood donors.

To help Gracey and other children who have this disease, the Wuest family organizes Gracey Fest, a fun event in Mt. Washington, KY, that raises money and awareness in support of the Cure JM Foundation. In addition to supporting this cause, the Wuests encourage Kentuckians to donate blood regularly so that it's always available for children who need it for their treatments.

Gracey has a simple but important message for blood donors: "Thank you for donating blood. Your donations help make my medicine so I can stay alive."

Watch this video to hear more from Gracey and her parents.
2017-04-24T15:06:52+00:00
Gracey has a rare autoimmune disease called Juvenile Dermatomyositis, a condition in which the immune system turns on to fight viruses but doesn't turn back off, causing it to attack healthy cells and tissue. Every four weeks, she receives a dose of medicine to help manage this disease. Making the treatment, however, requires over 1,000 blood donors. To help Gracey and other children who have this disease, the Wuest family organizes Gracey Fest, a fun event in Mt. Washington, KY, that raises money and awareness in support of the Cure JM Foundation. In addition to supporting this cause, the Wuests encourage Kentuckians to donate blood regularly so that it's always available for children who need it for their treatments. Gracey has a simple but important message for blood donors: "Thank you for donating blood. Your donations help make my medicine so I can stay alive." Watch this video to hear more from Gracey and her parents.
Lindsey Newland

Lindsey Newland

Lindsey Newland says her “helping gene is bigger than most.” That’s one reason why she donates platelets once a month and has given more than eight gallons.

She started donating as a whole blood donor, but when she heard her B-negative blood type was especially good for platelets, she made the switch to doing platelet pheresis donations.

A survivor of traumatic brain injury 15 years ago, Lindsey’s dedication to platelet donation is remarkable. Unable to drive, she must coordinate rides to and from the donor center so plans are made well in advance.

Lindsey, 32, gives at Beaumont Donor Center and says the “phlebotomists are rockin’ awesome.” She likes the rapport there and the friendships she’s established with the phlebotomists and screeners. “It’s good to see the familiar faces.”

When she was young, Lindsey knew she wanted to be in the healthcare field and now works at the University of Kentucky and Good Samaritan Hospital as a PBX operator. She probably didn’t know, though, that she’d play such an important role in the healthcare of many Kentucky patients.

Lindsey Newland, Lexington
Blood donor

2016-07-25T20:59:57+00:00

Lindsey Newland, Lexington
Blood donor

Lindsey Newland
Lindsey Newland says her “helping gene is bigger than most.” That’s one reason why she donates platelets once a month and has given more than eight gallons. She started donating as a whole blood donor, but when she heard her B-negative blood type was especially good for platelets, she made the switch to doing platelet pheresis donations. A survivor of traumatic brain injury 15 years ago, Lindsey’s dedication to platelet donation is remarkable. Unable to drive, she must coordinate rides to and from the donor center so plans are made well in advance. Lindsey, 32, gives at Beaumont Donor Center and says the “phlebotomists are rockin’ awesome.” She likes the rapport there and the friendships she’s established with the phlebotomists and screeners. “It’s good to see the familiar faces.” When she was young, Lindsey knew she wanted to be in the healthcare field and now works at the University of Kentucky and Good Samaritan Hospital as a PBX operator. She probably didn’t know, though, that she’d play such an important role in the healthcare of many Kentucky patients.
Michael Coleman

Michael Coleman

Michael began donating at his job. Although it was a way to get out of work, he also knew it was a good thing to do because his nephew had a kidney transplant and needed blood.

“I gave because I could. Life is precious, and I see a lot of people who can’t give. I can,” said Michael, who is usually decked out in his Cardinal gear when he comes to Kentucky Blood Center’s Beaumont location to donate.

He says people who don’t give but can are “not doing right with themselves. They need to go that extra mile. It pays off in the end.”

Michael Coleman, Lexington
Blood donor

2016-07-18T21:13:59+00:00

Michael Coleman, Lexington
Blood donor

Michael Coleman
Michael began donating at his job. Although it was a way to get out of work, he also knew it was a good thing to do because his nephew had a kidney transplant and needed blood. “I gave because I could. Life is precious, and I see a lot of people who can’t give. I can,” said Michael, who is usually decked out in his Cardinal gear when he comes to Kentucky Blood Center’s Beaumont location to donate. He says people who don’t give but can are “not doing right with themselves. They need to go that extra mile. It pays off in the end.”
Lucas Cannon

Lucas Cannon

Lucas Cannon was just 16 when he was severely injured in a tractor accident on his family farm. Airlifted to the hospital, Lucas underwent immediate surgery. In the weeks that followed, he required additional surgeries, receiving more than 150 blood transfusions. His right leg could not be saved and was amputated, then came months of physical therapy.

Today, Lucas is a college graduate with a degree in Organizational Leadership. He’s also a blood donor. “I donate every chance I get. I need to help replenish the stock,” he says.

Thanks to the 150 blood donors who saved Lucas’s life, he’s able to help others today.  “It’s an overwhelming selfless act.”

Lucas Cannon, Flemingsburg
Blood recipient and blood donor

2016-07-18T21:16:32+00:00

Lucas Cannon, Flemingsburg
Blood recipient and blood donor

Lucas Cannon
Lucas Cannon was just 16 when he was severely injured in a tractor accident on his family farm. Airlifted to the hospital, Lucas underwent immediate surgery. In the weeks that followed, he required additional surgeries, receiving more than 150 blood transfusions. His right leg could not be saved and was amputated, then came months of physical therapy. Today, Lucas is a college graduate with a degree in Organizational Leadership. He’s also a blood donor. “I donate every chance I get. I need to help replenish the stock,” he says. Thanks to the 150 blood donors who saved Lucas’s life, he’s able to help others today.  “It’s an overwhelming selfless act.”
Belinda Bay

Belinda Bay

Belinda Bay’s father, a well-respected real estate agent in Frankfort, became ill suddenly with an internal bleeding issue and received several transfusions that day. While the blood didn’t save his life, it did give the family more time to be with him to say their goodbyes.

“When I signed the form for the transfusion, I thought ‘what a hypocrite. I’ve never donated blood,’” said Belinda. A while later, she saw a local news story about how the bad winter weather was hurting the community’s blood supply. “They are probably short because I took it all,” Belinda thought. That’s when she decided she needed to have a blood drive to help give back.

The annual Billy Noblitt Memorial Blood Drive in Frankfort – named for her father but organized to help other Kentucky patients – began in May 2014 and has grown every year with live music, food, prizes and support from state and local government officials.

Belinda doesn’t just organize the blood drive, she rolls up her sleeve, too. “People don’t realize that 45 minutes of their time can save a life or help a family in need. I’m a big weenie, and if I can do it anyone can do it,” she said.

Belinda Bay, Frankfort
Blood drive coordinator and blood donor

2016-07-08T18:10:12+00:00

Belinda Bay, Frankfort
Blood drive coordinator and blood donor

Belinda Bay
Belinda Bay’s father, a well-respected real estate agent in Frankfort, became ill suddenly with an internal bleeding issue and received several transfusions that day. While the blood didn’t save his life, it did give the family more time to be with him to say their goodbyes. “When I signed the form for the transfusion, I thought ‘what a hypocrite. I’ve never donated blood,’” said Belinda. A while later, she saw a local news story about how the bad winter weather was hurting the community’s blood supply. “They are probably short because I took it all,” Belinda thought. That’s when she decided she needed to have a blood drive to help give back. The annual Billy Noblitt Memorial Blood Drive in Frankfort – named for her father but organized to help other Kentucky patients – began in May 2014 and has grown every year with live music, food, prizes and support from state and local government officials. Belinda doesn’t just organize the blood drive, she rolls up her sleeve, too. “People don’t realize that 45 minutes of their time can save a life or help a family in need. I’m a big weenie, and if I can do it anyone can do it,” she said.
Casey Dean

Casey Dean

Casey’s first time to donate was at the first Billy Noblitt Memorial Blood Drive in Frankfort. She’d seen posters about the blood drive, and when she saw the bloodmobile she decided to give it a try.

Now a dedicated blood donor, Casey frequently gives at blood drives at the Kentucky Personnel Cabinet, where she is an executive secretary. “We’re here to serve the people of the Commonwealth,” said Casey, who points out that offering convenient places to save lives is definitely a community service.

And for those who are afraid to donate, she encourages them with “You’re saving another life. All you can do is try. That day or the next day, you don’t know when you might need it.”

Casey Dean, Frankfort
Kentucky Personnel Cabinet Executive Secretary III, blood donor

2016-07-08T18:18:44+00:00

Casey Dean, Frankfort
Kentucky Personnel Cabinet Executive Secretary III, blood donor

Casey Dean
Casey’s first time to donate was at the first Billy Noblitt Memorial Blood Drive in Frankfort. She’d seen posters about the blood drive, and when she saw the bloodmobile she decided to give it a try. Now a dedicated blood donor, Casey frequently gives at blood drives at the Kentucky Personnel Cabinet, where she is an executive secretary. “We’re here to serve the people of the Commonwealth,” said Casey, who points out that offering convenient places to save lives is definitely a community service. And for those who are afraid to donate, she encourages them with “You’re saving another life. All you can do is try. That day or the next day, you don’t know when you might need it.”
Cindy Baker

Cindy Baker

Cindy Baker is the force behind the successful Mercer County High School blood drives.

Officially, she’s the school’s bookkeeper but she also acts as the blood drive chairperson. And at a school that hosts at least five successful blood drives a year, that’s a big undertaking.

“Awareness is a big thing. We meet with incoming freshman and make them aware of blood donation and how KBC blood stays local,” said Baker, who also tries to make blood drives fun with candy bars and pizza parties.

They also make the student donors feel special. “We reward the students. Seniors are required to do 10 community service hours to graduate. If they donate blood they get two hours,” she said. Seniors who have given a gallon or more during their high school career are presented a red cord at honors night to wear at graduation. “It signifies their contribution,” said Baker.

But what about those students who are afraid to give donation a try? “I tell them, ‘for a little pinch you have the ability to save three lives or five baby lives.’”

Cindy Baker, Harrodsburg
Mercer County High School Bookkeeper, blood drive chair and blood donor

2016-07-08T18:21:16+00:00

Cindy Baker, Harrodsburg
Mercer County High School Bookkeeper, blood drive chair and blood donor

Cindy Baker
Cindy Baker is the force behind the successful Mercer County High School blood drives. Officially, she’s the school’s bookkeeper but she also acts as the blood drive chairperson. And at a school that hosts at least five successful blood drives a year, that’s a big undertaking. “Awareness is a big thing. We meet with incoming freshman and make them aware of blood donation and how KBC blood stays local,” said Baker, who also tries to make blood drives fun with candy bars and pizza parties. They also make the student donors feel special. “We reward the students. Seniors are required to do 10 community service hours to graduate. If they donate blood they get two hours,” she said. Seniors who have given a gallon or more during their high school career are presented a red cord at honors night to wear at graduation. “It signifies their contribution,” said Baker. But what about those students who are afraid to give donation a try? “I tell them, ‘for a little pinch you have the ability to save three lives or five baby lives.’”
Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin donates blood with KBC

Gov. Matt Bevin

Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin understands the importance of donating blood. He recently took time from his busy schedule to visit a KBC blood drive in Frankfort. While on the bloodmobile, Gov. Bevin's staff recorded a video to walk viewers through the donation process and encourage everyone to roll up their sleeves for Kentucky patients.

"Donating blood is critical. It's necessary. It takes very little time," the Governor said. "It's an opportunity to change someone's life."

Watch the video on YouTube.

Matt Bevin, Frankfort
Governor of Kentucky

2016-08-10T15:35:49+00:00

Matt Bevin, Frankfort
Governor of Kentucky

Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin donates blood with KBC
Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin understands the importance of donating blood. He recently took time from his busy schedule to visit a KBC blood drive in Frankfort. While on the bloodmobile, Gov. Bevin's staff recorded a video to walk viewers through the donation process and encourage everyone to roll up their sleeves for Kentucky patients. "Donating blood is critical. It's necessary. It takes very little time," the Governor said. "It's an opportunity to change someone's life." Watch the video on YouTube.

Jim Hughes

Jim Hughes has been donating for a long time. He began in his 20s when his work would have blood drives. Then one time when he was at the blood center, he met a man who was giving platelets. Jim decided to give it a try. “Back then it was in both arms, but I saw the benefit to cancer patients, how platelets helped in their recovery. I just lost two brothers to cancer. If someone is lying there struggling, platelets help them,” he said. Now he gives every three weeks. “It’s my duty, honor and show of respect to give back,” said Hughes.

Jim Hughes, Lexington
Platelet donor, 21+ gallons

2016-07-08T18:23:01+00:00

Jim Hughes, Lexington
Platelet donor, 21+ gallons

Jim Hughes has been donating for a long time. He began in his 20s when his work would have blood drives. Then one time when he was at the blood center, he met a man who was giving platelets. Jim decided to give it a try. “Back then it was in both arms, but I saw the benefit to cancer patients, how platelets helped in their recovery. I just lost two brothers to cancer. If someone is lying there struggling, platelets help them,” he said. Now he gives every three weeks. “It’s my duty, honor and show of respect to give back,” said Hughes.
Byron Wilson

Byron Wilson

Byron Wilson, of Lexington, began donating blood when he was at Eastern Kentucky University, and he kept it up. “It’s a no brainer. Knowing you can help someone,” he said.

“If you can’t be a first responder, you can do something simple like sitting in a chair for 20 minutes and save a life,” said Byron, who is a special education teacher at Georgetown Middle School.

Byron said he donates because he would want a decent supply of blood available if something were to happen to him or his family. And for those who are afraid of needles? “It’s a little pinch. No worse than losing a tooth. It’s nothing to be afraid of.”

Byron Wilson, Lexington
Blood donor

2016-07-08T18:15:22+00:00

Byron Wilson, Lexington
Blood donor

Byron Wilson
Byron Wilson, of Lexington, began donating blood when he was at Eastern Kentucky University, and he kept it up. “It’s a no brainer. Knowing you can help someone,” he said. “If you can’t be a first responder, you can do something simple like sitting in a chair for 20 minutes and save a life,” said Byron, who is a special education teacher at Georgetown Middle School. Byron said he donates because he would want a decent supply of blood available if something were to happen to him or his family. And for those who are afraid of needles? “It’s a little pinch. No worse than losing a tooth. It’s nothing to be afraid of.”

Kim McClure

Kim had donated whole blood on and off since high school, but when she heard her friend’s son needed platelet transfusions, she was the first to offer to help.

The first grade teacher started donating platelets as soon as she heard 7-year-old Tanner needed them to help make him strong enough for his radiation and chemotherapy after brain cancer surgery.

Her platelets were usually designated for Tanner. “Some days they’d (Tanner’s family) take a picture of the yellow tag on the bag because they’d know it was from me. They’d send a message, ‘He’s getting yours today,’” said McClure.

Once Tanner got better and didn’t need her platelet help any longer, Kim continued giving. She saw the need for platelets and knew there were other cancer patients in Kentucky depending on her.

“It’s not about you. It’s about helping other people. If people were nicer to people, the world would be a nicer place,” said McClure.

“I’m O-positive. I love donating platelets. It’s the least I can do for someone else.”

Kim McClure

2016-07-08T18:24:50+00:00

Kim McClure

Kim had donated whole blood on and off since high school, but when she heard her friend’s son needed platelet transfusions, she was the first to offer to help. The first grade teacher started donating platelets as soon as she heard 7-year-old Tanner needed them to help make him strong enough for his radiation and chemotherapy after brain cancer surgery. Her platelets were usually designated for Tanner. “Some days they’d (Tanner’s family) take a picture of the yellow tag on the bag because they’d know it was from me. They’d send a message, ‘He’s getting yours today,’” said McClure. Once Tanner got better and didn’t need her platelet help any longer, Kim continued giving. She saw the need for platelets and knew there were other cancer patients in Kentucky depending on her. “It’s not about you. It’s about helping other people. If people were nicer to people, the world would be a nicer place,” said McClure. “I’m O-positive. I love donating platelets. It’s the least I can do for someone else.”

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