Donor Stories

Donor Stories

Kentucky Blood Center donor Jordan Heflin at Rupp Arena

Jordan Heflin

Jordan Heflin knows how important blood donation is. He sees its impact every day as a pediatric oncology / hematology nurse at the University of Kentucky Children’s Hospital.

Six years ago, Jordan began donating blood on a regular basis after realizing just how much blood young patients need. “If I can stick those kids with a needle, I can come in every two months,” he said.

Jordan also advocates for blood donation, frequently wearing his latest gallon pin and trying to convince others to become donors. It has become a favorite cause within his family, as his wife is also a UK nurse and a regular donor.

The power of blood donation hit even closer to home last year when Jordan’s father needed seven units of blood in the span of a week. The Heflin family was grateful for those who had generously donated the blood that would eventually help Jordan’s father.

“You’ll never truly know how much your donation impacts a family,” Jordan said.
2018-02-12T11:39:57-04:00
Kentucky Blood Center donor Jordan Heflin at Rupp Arena
Jordan Heflin knows how important blood donation is. He sees its impact every day as a pediatric oncology / hematology nurse at the University of Kentucky Children’s Hospital. Six years ago, Jordan began donating blood on a regular basis after realizing just how much blood young patients need. “If I can stick those kids with a needle, I can come in every two months,” he said. Jordan also advocates for blood donation, frequently wearing his latest gallon pin and trying to convince others to become donors. It has become a favorite cause within his family, as his wife is also a UK nurse and a regular donor. The power of blood donation hit even closer to home last year when Jordan’s father needed seven units of blood in the span of a week. The Heflin family was grateful for those who had generously donated the blood that would eventually help Jordan’s father. “You’ll never truly know how much your donation impacts a family,” Jordan said.
Lindsey Newland

Lindsey Newland

Lindsey Newland says her “helping gene is bigger than most.” That’s one reason why she donates platelets once a month and has given more than eight gallons.

She started donating as a whole blood donor, but when she heard her B-negative blood type was especially good for platelets, she made the switch to doing platelet pheresis donations.

A survivor of traumatic brain injury 15 years ago, Lindsey’s dedication to platelet donation is remarkable. Unable to drive, she must coordinate rides to and from the donor center so plans are made well in advance.

Lindsey, 32, gives at Beaumont Donor Center and says the “phlebotomists are rockin’ awesome.” She likes the rapport there and the friendships she’s established with the phlebotomists and screeners. “It’s good to see the familiar faces.”

When she was young, Lindsey knew she wanted to be in the healthcare field and now works at the University of Kentucky and Good Samaritan Hospital as a PBX operator. She probably didn’t know, though, that she’d play such an important role in the healthcare of many Kentucky patients.

Lindsey Newland, Lexington
Blood donor

2016-07-25T20:59:57-04:00

Lindsey Newland, Lexington
Blood donor

Lindsey Newland
Lindsey Newland says her “helping gene is bigger than most.” That’s one reason why she donates platelets once a month and has given more than eight gallons. She started donating as a whole blood donor, but when she heard her B-negative blood type was especially good for platelets, she made the switch to doing platelet pheresis donations. A survivor of traumatic brain injury 15 years ago, Lindsey’s dedication to platelet donation is remarkable. Unable to drive, she must coordinate rides to and from the donor center so plans are made well in advance. Lindsey, 32, gives at Beaumont Donor Center and says the “phlebotomists are rockin’ awesome.” She likes the rapport there and the friendships she’s established with the phlebotomists and screeners. “It’s good to see the familiar faces.” When she was young, Lindsey knew she wanted to be in the healthcare field and now works at the University of Kentucky and Good Samaritan Hospital as a PBX operator. She probably didn’t know, though, that she’d play such an important role in the healthcare of many Kentucky patients.
Cindy Baker

Cindy Baker

Cindy Baker is the force behind the successful Mercer County High School blood drives.

Officially, she’s the school’s bookkeeper but she also acts as the blood drive chairperson. And at a school that hosts at least five successful blood drives a year, that’s a big undertaking.

“Awareness is a big thing. We meet with incoming freshman and make them aware of blood donation and how KBC blood stays local,” said Baker, who also tries to make blood drives fun with candy bars and pizza parties.

They also make the student donors feel special. “We reward the students. Seniors are required to do 10 community service hours to graduate. If they donate blood they get two hours,” she said. Seniors who have given a gallon or more during their high school career are presented a red cord at honors night to wear at graduation. “It signifies their contribution,” said Baker.

But what about those students who are afraid to give donation a try? “I tell them, ‘for a little pinch you have the ability to save three lives or five baby lives.’”

Cindy Baker, Harrodsburg
Mercer County High School Bookkeeper, blood drive chair and blood donor

2016-07-08T18:21:16-04:00

Cindy Baker, Harrodsburg
Mercer County High School Bookkeeper, blood drive chair and blood donor

Cindy Baker
Cindy Baker is the force behind the successful Mercer County High School blood drives. Officially, she’s the school’s bookkeeper but she also acts as the blood drive chairperson. And at a school that hosts at least five successful blood drives a year, that’s a big undertaking. “Awareness is a big thing. We meet with incoming freshman and make them aware of blood donation and how KBC blood stays local,” said Baker, who also tries to make blood drives fun with candy bars and pizza parties. They also make the student donors feel special. “We reward the students. Seniors are required to do 10 community service hours to graduate. If they donate blood they get two hours,” she said. Seniors who have given a gallon or more during their high school career are presented a red cord at honors night to wear at graduation. “It signifies their contribution,” said Baker. But what about those students who are afraid to give donation a try? “I tell them, ‘for a little pinch you have the ability to save three lives or five baby lives.’”
Belinda Bay

Belinda Bay

Belinda Bay’s father, a well-respected real estate agent in Frankfort, became ill suddenly with an internal bleeding issue and received several transfusions that day. While the blood didn’t save his life, it did give the family more time to be with him to say their goodbyes.

“When I signed the form for the transfusion, I thought ‘what a hypocrite. I’ve never donated blood,’” said Belinda. A while later, she saw a local news story about how the bad winter weather was hurting the community’s blood supply. “They are probably short because I took it all,” Belinda thought. That’s when she decided she needed to have a blood drive to help give back.

The annual Billy Noblitt Memorial Blood Drive in Frankfort – named for her father but organized to help other Kentucky patients – began in May 2014 and has grown every year with live music, food, prizes and support from state and local government officials.

Belinda doesn’t just organize the blood drive, she rolls up her sleeve, too. “People don’t realize that 45 minutes of their time can save a life or help a family in need. I’m a big weenie, and if I can do it anyone can do it,” she said.

Belinda Bay, Frankfort
Blood drive coordinator and blood donor

2016-07-08T18:10:12-04:00

Belinda Bay, Frankfort
Blood drive coordinator and blood donor

Belinda Bay
Belinda Bay’s father, a well-respected real estate agent in Frankfort, became ill suddenly with an internal bleeding issue and received several transfusions that day. While the blood didn’t save his life, it did give the family more time to be with him to say their goodbyes. “When I signed the form for the transfusion, I thought ‘what a hypocrite. I’ve never donated blood,’” said Belinda. A while later, she saw a local news story about how the bad winter weather was hurting the community’s blood supply. “They are probably short because I took it all,” Belinda thought. That’s when she decided she needed to have a blood drive to help give back. The annual Billy Noblitt Memorial Blood Drive in Frankfort – named for her father but organized to help other Kentucky patients – began in May 2014 and has grown every year with live music, food, prizes and support from state and local government officials. Belinda doesn’t just organize the blood drive, she rolls up her sleeve, too. “People don’t realize that 45 minutes of their time can save a life or help a family in need. I’m a big weenie, and if I can do it anyone can do it,” she said.
Don Smith and Kaitlin Keane

Don Smith and Kaitlin Keane

April 11, 2018, was a special day for Woodford County donor Don Smith. He was making his 100th donation, an accomplishment in which he took great pride. However, he didn't realize just how special the trip to KBC would be. When he arrived at Beaumont Donor Center, he was surprised to see his granddaughter, Kaitlin Keane, who had driven from Louisville not only to be there for Don's milestone but also to become a blood donor herself.

Don started donating in the early 1960s and continued doing so occasionally. When he learned he had been one of 14 people whose donations were supporting a specific cancer patient, that spurred him to start donating regularly. He now donates platelets every two weeks.

When Kaitlin learned of her grandfather's dedication, she decided to commemorate the occasion with a family party, complete with blood donation-themed cookies. But first, she was inspired to turn Don's example into a family tradition. "If he could do it 100 times, I could do it one time," Kaitlin said.

Don Smith, Woodford Co., and Kaitlin Keane, Louisville
Blood donors
2018-04-30T09:19:00-04:00
Don Smith and Kaitlin Keane
April 11, 2018, was a special day for Woodford County donor Don Smith. He was making his 100th donation, an accomplishment in which he took great pride. However, he didn't realize just how special the trip to KBC would be. When he arrived at Beaumont Donor Center, he was surprised to see his granddaughter, Kaitlin Keane, who had driven from Louisville not only to be there for Don's milestone but also to become a blood donor herself. Don started donating in the early 1960s and continued doing so occasionally. When he learned he had been one of 14 people whose donations were supporting a specific cancer patient, that spurred him to start donating regularly. He now donates platelets every two weeks. When Kaitlin learned of her grandfather's dedication, she decided to commemorate the occasion with a family party, complete with blood donation-themed cookies. But first, she was inspired to turn Don's example into a family tradition. "If he could do it 100 times, I could do it one time," Kaitlin said. Don Smith, Woodford Co., and Kaitlin Keane, Louisville Blood donors
Michael Coleman

Michael Coleman

Michael began donating at his job. Although it was a way to get out of work, he also knew it was a good thing to do because his nephew had a kidney transplant and needed blood.

“I gave because I could. Life is precious, and I see a lot of people who can’t give. I can,” said Michael, who is usually decked out in his Cardinal gear when he comes to Kentucky Blood Center’s Beaumont location to donate.

He says people who don’t give but can are “not doing right with themselves. They need to go that extra mile. It pays off in the end.”

Michael Coleman, Lexington
Blood donor

2016-07-18T21:13:59-04:00

Michael Coleman, Lexington
Blood donor

Michael Coleman
Michael began donating at his job. Although it was a way to get out of work, he also knew it was a good thing to do because his nephew had a kidney transplant and needed blood. “I gave because I could. Life is precious, and I see a lot of people who can’t give. I can,” said Michael, who is usually decked out in his Cardinal gear when he comes to Kentucky Blood Center’s Beaumont location to donate. He says people who don’t give but can are “not doing right with themselves. They need to go that extra mile. It pays off in the end.”

Kim McClure

Kim had donated whole blood on and off since high school, but when she heard her friend’s son needed platelet transfusions, she was the first to offer to help.

The first grade teacher started donating platelets as soon as she heard 7-year-old Tanner needed them to help make him strong enough for his radiation and chemotherapy after brain cancer surgery.

Her platelets were usually designated for Tanner. “Some days they’d (Tanner’s family) take a picture of the yellow tag on the bag because they’d know it was from me. They’d send a message, ‘He’s getting yours today,’” said McClure.

Once Tanner got better and didn’t need her platelet help any longer, Kim continued giving. She saw the need for platelets and knew there were other cancer patients in Kentucky depending on her.

“It’s not about you. It’s about helping other people. If people were nicer to people, the world would be a nicer place,” said McClure.

“I’m O-positive. I love donating platelets. It’s the least I can do for someone else.”

Kim McClure

2016-07-08T18:24:50-04:00

Kim McClure

Kim had donated whole blood on and off since high school, but when she heard her friend’s son needed platelet transfusions, she was the first to offer to help. The first grade teacher started donating platelets as soon as she heard 7-year-old Tanner needed them to help make him strong enough for his radiation and chemotherapy after brain cancer surgery. Her platelets were usually designated for Tanner. “Some days they’d (Tanner’s family) take a picture of the yellow tag on the bag because they’d know it was from me. They’d send a message, ‘He’s getting yours today,’” said McClure. Once Tanner got better and didn’t need her platelet help any longer, Kim continued giving. She saw the need for platelets and knew there were other cancer patients in Kentucky depending on her. “It’s not about you. It’s about helping other people. If people were nicer to people, the world would be a nicer place,” said McClure. “I’m O-positive. I love donating platelets. It’s the least I can do for someone else.”
Casey Dean

Casey Dean

Casey’s first time to donate was at the first Billy Noblitt Memorial Blood Drive in Frankfort. She’d seen posters about the blood drive, and when she saw the bloodmobile she decided to give it a try.

Now a dedicated blood donor, Casey frequently gives at blood drives at the Kentucky Personnel Cabinet, where she is an executive secretary. “We’re here to serve the people of the Commonwealth,” said Casey, who points out that offering convenient places to save lives is definitely a community service.

And for those who are afraid to donate, she encourages them with “You’re saving another life. All you can do is try. That day or the next day, you don’t know when you might need it.”

Casey Dean, Frankfort
Kentucky Personnel Cabinet Executive Secretary III, blood donor

2016-07-08T18:18:44-04:00

Casey Dean, Frankfort
Kentucky Personnel Cabinet Executive Secretary III, blood donor

Casey Dean
Casey’s first time to donate was at the first Billy Noblitt Memorial Blood Drive in Frankfort. She’d seen posters about the blood drive, and when she saw the bloodmobile she decided to give it a try. Now a dedicated blood donor, Casey frequently gives at blood drives at the Kentucky Personnel Cabinet, where she is an executive secretary. “We’re here to serve the people of the Commonwealth,” said Casey, who points out that offering convenient places to save lives is definitely a community service. And for those who are afraid to donate, she encourages them with “You’re saving another life. All you can do is try. That day or the next day, you don’t know when you might need it.”
Byron Wilson

Byron Wilson

Byron Wilson, of Lexington, began donating blood when he was at Eastern Kentucky University, and he kept it up. “It’s a no brainer. Knowing you can help someone,” he said.

“If you can’t be a first responder, you can do something simple like sitting in a chair for 20 minutes and save a life,” said Byron, who is a special education teacher at Georgetown Middle School.

Byron said he donates because he would want a decent supply of blood available if something were to happen to him or his family. And for those who are afraid of needles? “It’s a little pinch. No worse than losing a tooth. It’s nothing to be afraid of.”

Byron Wilson, Lexington
Blood donor

2016-07-08T18:15:22-04:00

Byron Wilson, Lexington
Blood donor

Byron Wilson
Byron Wilson, of Lexington, began donating blood when he was at Eastern Kentucky University, and he kept it up. “It’s a no brainer. Knowing you can help someone,” he said. “If you can’t be a first responder, you can do something simple like sitting in a chair for 20 minutes and save a life,” said Byron, who is a special education teacher at Georgetown Middle School. Byron said he donates because he would want a decent supply of blood available if something were to happen to him or his family. And for those who are afraid of needles? “It’s a little pinch. No worse than losing a tooth. It’s nothing to be afraid of.”

Alyssa Hawkins

Alyssa Hawkins is the blood drive coordinator for the AssuredPartners NL Blood Drive in Lexington where she is an account executive. She makes arrangements for when the blood drive will happen and where the bloodmobile will park. She’s also the blood drive cheerleader, encouraging her coworkers to make appointments for the drive or cheering on first-time blood donors.

While Alyssa knows donating is important, it’s personal for her and many others at AssuredPartners. They donate in memory of their friend and former coworker Emily Rhoads, who died in a car accident in 2015 when she was 27.

After the accident, “Emily received lots of units (of blood),” said Alyssa. That’s when the company decided to host the blood drive in her memory and to help others in the community who need blood. “We do it to save lives,” said Alyssa.

And for those who have never tried donating? “I tell them to just try it. You’re saving lives, and I will even hold their hands,” said Alyssa.

Kentucky Blood Center is always looking for new companies/organizations/schools and communities to sponsor blood drives. If you are interested in supporting Kentucky patients by hosting a blood drive, please click here http://kybloodcenter.org/why-donate/host-blood-drive/.

Alyssa Hawkins, Lexington
Blood drive chairperson and blood donor

 
2017-08-04T14:56:03-04:00
Alyssa Hawkins is the blood drive coordinator for the AssuredPartners NL Blood Drive in Lexington where she is an account executive. She makes arrangements for when the blood drive will happen and where the bloodmobile will park. She’s also the blood drive cheerleader, encouraging her coworkers to make appointments for the drive or cheering on first-time blood donors. While Alyssa knows donating is important, it’s personal for her and many others at AssuredPartners. They donate in memory of their friend and former coworker Emily Rhoads, who died in a car accident in 2015 when she was 27. After the accident, “Emily received lots of units (of blood),” said Alyssa. That’s when the company decided to host the blood drive in her memory and to help others in the community who need blood. “We do it to save lives,” said Alyssa. And for those who have never tried donating? “I tell them to just try it. You’re saving lives, and I will even hold their hands,” said Alyssa. Kentucky Blood Center is always looking for new companies/organizations/schools and communities to sponsor blood drives. If you are interested in supporting Kentucky patients by hosting a blood drive, please click here http://kybloodcenter.org/why-donate/host-blood-drive/. Alyssa Hawkins, Lexington Blood drive chairperson and blood donor  

Jim Hughes

Jim Hughes has been donating for a long time. He began in his 20s when his work would have blood drives. Then one time when he was at the blood center, he met a man who was giving platelets. Jim decided to give it a try. “Back then it was in both arms, but I saw the benefit to cancer patients, how platelets helped in their recovery. I just lost two brothers to cancer. If someone is lying there struggling, platelets help them,” he said. Now he gives every three weeks. “It’s my duty, honor and show of respect to give back,” said Hughes.

Jim Hughes, Lexington
Platelet donor, 21+ gallons

2016-07-08T18:23:01-04:00

Jim Hughes, Lexington
Platelet donor, 21+ gallons

Jim Hughes has been donating for a long time. He began in his 20s when his work would have blood drives. Then one time when he was at the blood center, he met a man who was giving platelets. Jim decided to give it a try. “Back then it was in both arms, but I saw the benefit to cancer patients, how platelets helped in their recovery. I just lost two brothers to cancer. If someone is lying there struggling, platelets help them,” he said. Now he gives every three weeks. “It’s my duty, honor and show of respect to give back,” said Hughes.